Ryan Ackroyd - LulzSec, 50 days of Lulz # Anonymous is an idea

Ryan Ackroyd - LulzSec, 50 days of Lulz

Thursday 18 December 2014

Ryan Ackroyd’s Talk at Sheffield Hallam University.

Ryan Ackroyd aka Kayla (#LulzSec) fiddled nervously with the microphone clipped to his shirt as about 200 fellow students crowded into an auditorium at Sheffield Hallam University.

“This is the first lecture I’ve ever done,” he told them, after being introduced as a former computer hacker and current student. “I’ve done some very, very naughty things.”

Ryan Ackroyd, 27, and three other members of the LulzSec hacking collective were jailed in 2013. The group’s members, who never met in person, disrupted the websites of Sony Corp. (6758), News Corp. (NWSA) the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency and Arizona police. They also targeted the U.S. Air Force and Britain’s National Health Service.

Companies suffered serious financial and reputational damage,” said Andrew Hadik, a U.K. prosecutor, after the four were sentenced in May 2013. Ackroyd, who had pleaded guilty to the charges, was sentenced to 30 months in prison and served nine months. Released early in February, he’s studying for a master’s degree in information systems security at Sheffield Hallam, about a three-hour train ride north of London.

“I just saw a challenge in getting into a server,” he said in the Sheffield talk, which he called: LulzSec, 50 Days of Lulz.
“If I couldn’t get into it, it just made me want to get into it more.”

LulzSec was an offshoot of Anonymous, the online activists who attacked PayPal Inc. and MasterCard Inc. (MA) websites when those companies stopped payments to WikiLeaks after it published U.S. military information. The name is derived from the phrase “laughing at security,” because they found online security was so poor it deserved derision.

LulzSec’s handful of members accessed millions of user names and e-mail addresses from Sony’s server, and intercepted FBI communications from a private contractor’s computer system.

“We never cared about money.”
“If we had wanted money, we would have done banks and you would have never heard about it.”

Ryan described the hacker’s toolkit, rainbow tables and SQL injection, and how he used weaknesses in programming code or vulnerable passwords to take control of systems.

“All of this is very illegal,” he said, to laughter from the audience.

Ryan received an information-technology degree while in prison and hopes to make a career in ethical hacking, although he accepts it might be difficult for employers to trust him.

“I’m still probably going to find it difficult to go into industry because of my criminal record.”

After finishing the lecture, Ackroyd went to a coffee shop with his tutor, Dr. David Day.

“While I was in prison, I thought that was it, I’m never going to get a job,” he said. He’s still subject to bail conditions; he can’t use certain types of encryption and must report to police if he owns a computer. “Now that I’m out, I’m a bit more optimistic. I wanted to study, hopefully that will lead to somewhere good.”

Barrett Brown's criticisms of Julian Assange are valid

Barrett Brown’s criticisms of Julian Assange are valid

A message from the Jeremy Hammond Defense Committee. Dear Courage Foundation: As an org that seeks to defend and protect whistleblowers and champion the rights of free (...)


Barrett Brown's statement about Julian Assange

Barrett Brown’s statement about Julian Assange

Regarding my banishment from the Courage Foundation at the behest of Julian Assange. This is the full statement I provided to The Daily Beast on the matter of the board of (...)


Naomi Colvin: I have been obliged to resign from Courage

Naomi Colvin: I have been obliged to resign from Courage

Naomi Colvin: “rather unfortunately, I have been obliged to resign from Courage.” On Thursday afternoon three of Courage’s trustees wrote to me demanding that I inform Barrett (...)


Freeanons is reorganizing

Freeanons is reorganizing

We are happy to announce that we have begun restoring freeanons.org. With the generous support and encouragement of many community members, Freeanons is reorganizing. We are (...)


Join the resistance

Tor hidden-service - IRC.CyberGuerrilla

Tor Socks5: 9050 - Host: 6dvj6v5imhny3anf.onion - Port: 6697 - SSL
Webchat #OpNewBlood
Tor protects your privacy - Tor Browser is an easy-to-use, portable package of Tor. By downloading and using Tor, you can protect the people who need anonymity, like activists, journalists and bloggers...

Anonymous t-shirt

Anonymous T-Shirts
T-Shirt and Hooded Jacket
Tails
Tails is an irreplaceable security tool as it allows anyone to use computers safely
Tor Browser
Tor Browser
Tor protects your privacy
NordVPN
NordVPN
Fast VPN Speeds